Meeting with Million Veteran Program researchers at Boston VA

I had a great discussion with Drs. Louis Fiore, Leornard DAvolio and other members of their team at MAVERIC. I presented a powerpoint about OSEHRA, what the objectives are in terms of Vista, and they were very suppotive and interested.

A next step will be to schedule a webinar or teleconference with the Boston-based MVP team so that they can better understand the architecture.

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very interesting, Gerry

Tom Munnecke's picture

This is a really cool connection to make... what I particularly like about this is that it is a concrete driver for the architecture to deal with genomics, big data, personalization, future access to legacy databases, grid computing, and a whole host of other topics that we need to be thinking about NOW.

I was impressed with Eric Topol's Future of Genomic Medicine conference last month, and came away thinking that things are happening much sooner and at a faster rate than folks think.  I was also impressed with his "Science of Individuality" in his new book, The Creative Destruction of Medicine, which has a wealth of ideas about how medicine needs to change in response to the digital era.

The VA is in an historic position of having the long term clinical data bases that it has, coupled with the Million Veteran genomic information.  Now, if we can just pull together an information architecture to "create a path of least resistance" to make this happen, I think we could be talking about some revolutionary tools to lead medicine into the next era of personalization and unravelling of the gene.

I'll be back in Cambridge to attend the O'Reilly Health Foo Camp May 18-20 and will be around before and after; it would be great to meet them.  I'm also organizing a "salon" type workshop on multi-scale perspectives of health at the New England Complexity Systems Institute with Yaneer Bar Yam (http://necsi.edu/research/multiscale/ ).  I've been thinking a lot thinking about scale in health.  While everyone seems to be fixated on one characteristic scale in health care: what docs do to patients - there's a lot more going on - as evidenced by genomics, but also by global pandemic scale of things, as well.

 

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very interesting, Gerry

Tom Munnecke's picture

This is a really cool connection to make... what I particularly like about this is that it is a concrete driver for the architecture to deal with genomics, big data, personalization, future access to legacy databases, grid computing, and a whole host of other topics that we need to be thinking about NOW.

I was impressed with Eric Topol's Future of Genomic Medicine conference last month, and came away thinking that things are happening much sooner and at a faster rate than folks think.  I was also impressed with his "Science of Individuality" in his new book, The Creative Destruction of Medicine, which has a wealth of ideas about how medicine needs to change in response to the digital era.

The VA is in an historic position of having the long term clinical data bases that it has, coupled with the Million Veteran genomic information.  Now, if we can just pull together an information architecture to "create a path of least resistance" to make this happen, I think we could be talking about some revolutionary tools to lead medicine into the next era of personalization and unravelling of the gene.

I'll be back in Cambridge to attend the O'Reilly Health Foo Camp May 18-20 and will be around before and after; it would be great to meet them.  I'm also organizing a "salon" type workshop on multi-scale perspectives of health at the New England Complexity Systems Institute with Yaneer Bar Yam (http://necsi.edu/research/multiscale/ ).  I've been thinking a lot thinking about scale in health.  While everyone seems to be fixated on one characteristic scale in health care: what docs do to patients - there's a lot more going on - as evidenced by genomics, but also by global pandemic scale of things, as well.

 

like0